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Genetics of transformation and regeneration in horticultural brassicas. - HH0909SFV

Description
Transformation provides the plant breeder with the possibility to modify crop plants in a variety of ways including to provide more robust disease or pest resistance and to improve product quality. Currently, genetic modification methods result in a gene being introduced into a particular genotype; the gene is then transferred to the line of interest by conventional cross pollination. In a winter-sown crop with a vernalisation requirement such as B.oleracea, to transfer the desired gene in this way may take 10-15 years to produce a new variety. If the gene can be introduced into an advanced breeding line the time take for this process can be reduced. The results of this programme will make it possible for breeders to select suitable lines for transformation from their advanced breeding material.

The aim of this study is to identify genetic loci associated with shoot (and root) regeneration, background antibiotic resistance and tissue sensitivity to Agrobacterium infection, to determine the nature of the genetic control of these traits, and to identify genetic markers to facilitate the selection of breeding material for use in GM breeding programmes
Objective
The aim of this study is to identify genetic loci associated with shoot (and root) regeneration, background antibiotic resistance and tissue sensitivity to Agrobacterium infection, to determine the nature of the genetic control of these traits, and to identify genetic markers to facilitate the selection of breeding material for use in GM breeding programmes.

The scientific objectives of the programme are:

1.Identification of genetic loci. Using a detailed RFLP map of B.oleracea, identify genetic loci associated with shoot (and root) regeneration, background antibiotic resistance and tissue sensitivity to Agrobacterium infection, that affect the production and regeneration of transgenic plants . (0-18months)

2.Segregation analysis. Carry out a detailed crossing programme to determine if few or many genes control each trait. (0-24months)

3.Identify linked markers. The RFLP map of B.oleracea will be used to look for genetic markers associated with each genetic locus. Where one or a few genes control a trait, an attempt will be made to identify markers associated with each gene. (6- 24 months)

4. Interaction between loci. Once genetic loci associated with each of the principle factors have been identified, populations of plants will be produced to determine if and how the traits interact. (12- 30months)

5. Screening system. Develop markers to identify genotypes that are amenable to transformation
(24-36months)

6. Identify markers associated with key genes. Where a one or a few genes control a trait, identify markers associated with each gene to facilitate their transfer to recalcitrant lines (24-36 months)

7. To determine the value of shoot regeneration frequency and susceptibility to Agrobacterium tumefaciens as predictors of transformability in double haploid lines of Brassica oleracea (34-42 months)

Project Documents
• Final Report : Genetics of transformation and regeneration in horticultural brassicas   (1360k)
Time-Scale and Cost
From: 1999

To: 2002

Cost: £298,195
Contractor / Funded Organisations
John Innes Centre (BBSRC)
Keywords
Biotechnology              
Brassicas              
Breeding              
Farming              
Genetically modified food and crops              
GM Food              
Horticulture              
Quality              
Vegetables              
Fields of Study
Horticulture
Horticulture