Defra - Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Science Search

Science and Research Projects

Return to Science Search homepage   Return to Project List

Food Consumption in the UK: Trends, Attitudes and Drivers - FO0512

Description
What we eat has big implications for our health, our society and the environment. Understanding these trends, what drives them, and how we can change consumption practices through interventions is crucial to inform policy. Defra commissioned Rand Europe to provide an overview of the existing evidence in four main areas:

1. The trends related to consumer food practices and attitudes, and to the changing food environment (e.g. out-of-home sector, online retail models) in the UK.
2. The drivers of consumption (e.g. the role of information or food system actors).
3. Interventions that can influence food consumption practices.
4. The differences between groups, or ‘food publics’ across the trends, drivers and interventions (i.e. segmentation).

The report provides evidence around these questions and identifies areas of uncertainty where more evidence is required, and suggests a number of priority areas for action and further research.The study approach consisted of a rapid evidence assessment (REA) with a focus on high-quality, primarily academic literature from the last ten years.
Objective
The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the existing evidence in four main areas:
1. The trends related to consumer food practices and attitudes, and to the changing food environment (e.g. out-of-home sector , online retail models) in the UK.
2. The drivers of consumption (e.g. the role of information or food system actors).
3. Interventions that can influence food consumption practices.
4. The differences between groups, or ‘food publics’, across the trends, drivers and interventions (i.e. segmentation).
Project Documents
• TRP - Technical Report : RAND DEFRA Food Consumption in the UK   (14313k)
Time-Scale and Cost
From: 2019

To: 2020

Cost: £92,212
Contractor / Funded Organisations
RAND Europe
Keywords
Food              
Social Research              
Social Sciences