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Decision-making research into farmers’ cattle purchasing behaviour, investigating the current role of TB risk assessment in purchase decisions and appraising future ways to increase the importance of such risk assessment - ZF0532

Description
Cattle movements can play a role in the spread of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in England. Statutory and voluntary methods have been introduced to prevent and reduce cattle to cattle transmission, such as pre- and post-movement testing, risk-based trading, and assurance schemes. However, there is a poor understanding of farmers’ cattle purchasing decisions, the factors that influence farmers’ decision-making, and farmers’ use of information when purchasing cattle. In particular, there has been very limited robust qualitative research to understand farmers’ decision making or assess how behavioural science can be used to support farmers’ cattle purchasing decisions in order to limit the spread of bTB. It is possible that farmers’ decisions can be supported by the use of behavioural insights, i.e. subtle changes in the way information about purchases are communicated.
Objective
The aim of this project is therefore to develop an in-depth analysis of the reasons for cattle purchasing and, using these data, develop and discuss different behavioural measures that could be used to reduce the spread of bTB. Specifically, the project will address the following questions:

1. What are the factors influencing farmers’ livestock purchasing decisions?
2. What role does different forms of information play in shaping farmers’ purchasing decisions?
3. How can different behavioural insights and policy interventions influence farmers’ behaviour?
4. How does farmers’ behaviour vary between farms and areas of different disease status?
Time-Scale and Cost
From: 2019

To: 2020

Cost: £107,042
Contractor / Funded Organisations
Cardiff University
Keywords
Animals              
Bovine              
Cattle              
Disease Control              
Social Research              
Transmission              
Tuberculosis