Defra - Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

Science Search

Science and Research Projects

Return to Science Search homepage   Return to Project List

Understanding & Predicting Beach Morphological Change Processess Associated with the Erosion of Cohesive Foreshores - FD1915

Description
Project Closing Statement:
This project comprised a scoping study, to current best practice, of the processes of weathering and erosion of cohesive shore platforms and their interactions with adjoining beaches (and cliffs). The study identifies R&D needs and recommendations to address gaps in understanding of these types of shoreline. The main outputs are a scoping report reviewing previous research in the field and providing preliminary advice. It will be used by a wide-ranging audience, although targeted primarily to coastal managers.

Summary Objective:
a)To identify current best practice / state of the art into the Processes associated with the erosion of cohesive foreshores and interactions with the sediment budget, and b) to identify the research and development needs to address the gaps in current knowledge.

Key Customer Purpose:
To provide guidance of best practise to those manageing an eroding cohesive coastline such as prevails along the East Coast of England and the Severn Estuary.
Project Documents
• Final Report : Understanding and predicting beach morphological change processes associated with the erosion of cohesive foreshores   (103k)
• Technical Report : Understanding and predicting beach morphological change processes associated with the erosion of cohesive foreshores   (1606k)
• Technical Summary : Understanding and predicting beach morphological change processes associated with the erosion of cohesive foreshores   (78k)
Time-Scale and Cost
From: 2003

To: 2004

Cost: £29,776
Contractor / Funded Organisations
Posford Haskoning
Keywords
Coastal Defence              
Environmental Protection              
Flood and Coastal Defence              
Land              
Processes              
Fields of Study
Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management